Reading Rec: How to Market a Book by Ricardo Fayet

Hello dear readers! This month’s book review is a little different from my usual fare because I’m covering a non-fiction craft book. Following last week’s post, I was motivated to dig into some deeper research on marketing, and was pleased to stumble across this How-To guide from one of my favorite resources. Today I’ll be sharing some notes and major take-aways that I hadn’t already learned from my earlier research! Hopefully this will include some insightful new information

How to Market a Book: Overperform in a Crowded Market (Reedsy Marketing Guides Book 1)

This book is an incredibly detailed, thoughtful, and relevant look into the online publishing industry in 2021. It reiterates the fundamentals of building an author’s platform and offers advanced ideas for anyone who wants to take the business side of writing seriously. If you’re anything like me, you grew up with a lecture of “Writing isn’t a real career” and “you don’t want to be a starving artist, do you?” While it’s true that an extremely small number of authors become household names, there are countless other authors making a decent living off their craft and even working for themselves full time.

If this is your end goal, and you’re familiar with or at least willing to learn how to be a businessperson, then I highly recommend this book for you. If you’re not sure yet how much time and effort you want to put into your author’s platform, I still recommend this book, but specifically sections 1-3, which explain the fundamentals of how to make it in the publishing world. The language is very easy to understand, and it’s an excellent in-depth primer to get you thinking and planning for the future. Then, when you’re ready to tackle the advanced marketing and advertising sections of the book, you already have the reference material in your back pocket.

Additionally, the e-book is completely free. It’s roughly 60K words, but its an easy read and I got through it in about a week. The author, Ricardo Fayet is an expert in the industry and the co-founder of the company, Reedsy, which is how I found the book. Reedsy has proven to be one of the MOST valuable resources I’ve found in my researching endeavors, and I look forward to taking advantage of their free courses and other resources when I reach those points in my author’s journey.

So, without further ado, let’s get into the big ideas, shall we?

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Author Platform Crash Course: Marketing and Publishing Tips

When I started my writeblr during a rotation break at my lifeguard shift, I never expected I’d be writing this post today. What I’m about to share with you is the result of two years learning how to navigate online writing communities, two marketing classes in my business minor, countless influences from successful authors I admire, and 22 pages of notes taken from my marketing and publishing research. I’ve learned so much and I’m honored to have come so far since I first started putting my writing out there on the internet!

Before I get started with the information, I’d like to include a few disclaimers:

  • This information is accurate and up-to-date as of Summer 2021. If you are reading this post at a later date, keep that in mind, and do your own research accordingly.
  • I am a white English speaker based in the US, so this research does not include a nuanced view of other countries’ markets, legal processes, and publishing industries, nor information on publishing in other languages or as part of a minority group. While I tried my best to make it as inclusive as possible within a realistic scope, it is by no means all-encompassing.

If you’re reading this, I’m assuming that you have a story you want to release! The first step to publishing is getting the manuscript into a state where it’s ready to be sent out into the world, which means editing. If you’d like a comprehensive guide on the editing process, check out this post first! That being said, I’ll start by sharing my publishing research!

Traditional vs Self/Indie Publishing:

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June Goals Recap

Happy Summer, my friends! This month was a fun change of pace from the relentless toll of schoolwork, and my social calendar filled up fast. Between my busy work schedule, graduation and birthday parties, catch-up lunch dates and a friend’s wedding, I did my best to also catch up on my writing goals, often sneaking words in during road trips. I’ll be going back to campus in the fall, and I don’t want to take in-person learning for-granted after the last year and a half of zoom university. Since I anticipate throwing myself into clubs, research, and studies, I also know I need to make the best of this summer for the sake of my WIPs. “For everything there is a season, and a time for every activity under heaven…” (Ecclesiastes 3). Since this summer will be my season of writing before setting it aside, I made my creative goals fairly ambitious this month, and I’m pleased with how much progress I’ve made, even though there’s always a nagging voice in the back of my head that I could be doing more.

Overall Goals: Won by 1 point – 14/26 goals

Creative goals: Won by 3 points – 8/11 goals

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Mythology, Fantasy, and Adaptations – an interview with Karkki

Welcome everyone! In June, I focused on the topic of tropes and adaptations, and couldn’t pass up the opportunity to interview one of my writer friends about her area of expertise! I’ve been following Karkki’s The Shield-Maiden Saga and other WIPs over on tumblr for about two years. It’s always a blast to see the new updates and lore, so I was happy for the excuse to host a Q&A, and honored to share the results with you! Thank you Karkki for agreeing to do this! I’m super excited to share her creativity with you all today. For this interview, my parts and questions are in the headings, and their responses are everything written below.

Question 1 – First, can you tell me about yourself, how long you’ve been writing, and what you write?

Thank you so much for inviting me to be interviewed! I’m Karkki, a Finnish architecture student in my mid-twenties. Other than writing I paint, sew, pet my cat and hike. I’ve been writing since I was around ten. At first it was just scenes of my OCs (I had a whole cinematic universe of them), but the first book form story I started to write, I did around 14, I think. Nowadays I write mostly adult dark fantasy, often smashed together with various different genres 😀

Question 2 – You write a lot of stories inspired by history and mythology; how did you first get into these topics?

I had a very strong Egyptian mythology phase when I was kid, like many others it seems. I was obsessed with it and I’ve always been fascinated by history. Later, in my teens I read an article about historical research on Vikings and it rekindled my interest in history and mythology. I got one of my earliest book ideas from that too, which after many twists and turns has become a historical fantasy WIP, The Shield-Maiden Saga. I gained interest in the more recent history after watching Pride and Prejudice (1995 of course) like many others.

Question 3 – How do you go about doing research?

I start with Wikipedia. It is a hole that sucks me in and won’t let me go. But even though it doesn’t contain the most in-depth and nuanced info, it’s a great way to learn of the things you want to learn about. After I’ve found interesting things I want to learn more about, I look for articles, books and videos. Depending on what I’m writing I pay attention to the credibility of the information. For historical fiction I look for multiple sources and make sure the text has proper sources. If I’m researching for fantasy, I only really focus on what is interesting and gives me inspiration.

Question 4 – How much of the research actually goes into the stories? Do you prefer to write AUs, strict historical fiction, or historically-inspired-fantasy?

All of them actually. Well, by AU I mostly mean our universe but with fantasy elements. My WIPs include historical fantasy set in Viking Age (which I mentioned) with some grounded history and a ton of fantasy elements, high fantasy inspired mostly from Regency period, Roman Empire and Finnish mythology, high fantasy inspired mostly by Victorian Era and Republic of Venice, and my newest WIP historical fiction set in Golden Age of Piracy with some magical realism. I’d say in the end a lot of the research never, at least directly ends up in the book. With historical fiction most of it is building the world and it’s in the background but might not be directly referred to. With high fantasy it’s even less as most of it is for inspiration and therefore not included as it is.

Question 5 – Do you get the idea for the story first, and then do research around the premise, or do you get story ideas from your research? Top down or bottom up?

My writing process is very messy 😀 I usually get a very broad idea I vibe with. Then I start researching it and get a lot more ideas and the story starts to shape up as I’m researching. I sometimes also read something not related to writing and inspiration hits. With high fantasy it’s usually more top down, I research something specific I need ideas.

Question 6 – What are your favorite historical periods and mythologies?

I have always a hard time picking my favorite anything so I’ll have to mention several. My favorite historical periods are the between World Wars period, Victorian Era, Golden Age of Piracy, Italian Renaissance, Late Medieval Period, Viking Age, Classical Rome, Ancient Egypt, Edo and Meiji periods in Japan and the Warring State Period in China. For mythologies: Finnish, Sámi, Egyptian, Celtic, Japanese, Slavic and Etruscan mythology. There’s a lot more historical periods and mythologies especially outside Europe I’m really interested in, but don’t know enough yet to say if they are my favorites or not. I am in the process of learning about the things I never learned in school.

Question 7 – What are some of your favorite tropes from mythology to use in your own writing?

One of my favorites, that I can’t stop using, is the concept of spirit and or magic residing in blood. I’ve come across it or something similar at least in Norse, Finnish and Sámi mythology. In Norse myths there’s stories of drinking the blood of an animal and gaining some of their abilities. In Finnish mythology though, the magic is described to be specifically inside bones, where the blood gets created. Another related trope I enjoy a lot is magic and spirit being one and the same. In Finnish mythology humans have three souls, one of them is an elf, also known as luonto (nature) or väki. Väki means both folk and power. The elves are often referred to as “väki”, but so is magic. It’s where humans gain their magical abilities.

One last trope I’ll mention is the very common trope of natural spirits. There’s the Finnish elves and Greek nymphs and many many others. I just really love anthropomorphic nature.

Question 8 – Do you subvert any of the classic tropes that you adapt? 

One thing I like to do is include evil spirits and reveal they are not that evil actually and include good spirits and show them to be more questionable. Nature can see evil sometimes in it’s hostility, but it never really is. It’s always neutral. A specific instance of a subverted trope I’ve done is how I included Tyrfing, a cursed sword from Völsung Saga into The Shield-Maiden Saga. The sword is not actually cursed, rather it has an imprisoned elf inside, who just happens to be very bloodthirsty and sadistic.

Question 9 – How do you fit magic systems into your historical elements? 

I often base my magic systems at least partly on mythology. I always make sure though that the magic system never works exactly like in mythology (or the internal mythology of the world). Mythology is born to explain the world people don’t understand so it would lose a lot of cultural context, if it was an accurate description of the world. When I create my own world, I often start with a magic system and then think about what kind of mythologies different cultures would build around it and other natural phenomena. When I use real world, I start with the existing mythologies and think how the magic would really work. I often combine different mythologies and add my own spins, as I don’t want to give the impression that any one culture got it right. I also often use a softer magic system. I feel like it better conveys the feeling of how science and magic worked back then. People didn’t know how they worked, but by trial and error they found some things that worked often, but not always.

Question 10 – Do you have any advice for other writers looking to build a historical-fantasy-scifi story?

First of all, if you take inspiration from the history of a culture you are not part of, do your research extra well. And if you’re writing historical fiction, double that. Use sources by the culture, since you’ll easily get a very biased view from the sources written by outsiders. If you are planning a world of your own, I’d suggest taking a broad look at a lot of different cultures and eras even if you know what period you’ll take inspiration from. It’ll give you a feel on the ways societies and cultures shape and what things are not universal.

But the main point is to have fun with it. If you don’t like researching, no worries, there’s no rule that says your fiction has to be historically accurate. Though if you don’t already know the culture intimately this approach might not work well. At the end of the day though, there’s no rules in writing at all. Read about the things that interest you and emphasize them in your writing. It shows positively when you lean into your passions.

11 – Where can we find you and your work? 

I tell about my writing progress and WIPs more or less regularly on my Tumblr blog @kittensartwriting! I’m always happy to find more like-minded writing buddies!


Thank you so much to Karkki for agreeing to be a guest on today’s post! I enjoy picking my friends’ brains with overly specific questions about certain things, so it was fascinating for me to read through all the detailed thoughtful answers with SO MANY brilliant ideas behind them. I’m thrilled to be able to share it with my readers too. If you liked reading about her process, I highly recommend checking out the rest of Karkki’s work and supporting her WIPs! You absolutely won’t regret it. Thank you for reading, and I’ll see you next week! 🙂

Awesome Adaptations: The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

Welcome back to the Reading Rec series, where I rant about my favorite books and talk about how reading and analyzing them can make us better writers! This month, I’m covering tropes and how to adapt them to different stories, and there’s no better genre for this than folktales. Because these stories are so ingrained in pop culture, everyone already knows the main characters, plot beats, and motifs, which makes them perfect to translate into retellings. Not only does this series have a great premise, it also has great cover design. Even if you’ve never read this series, you can guess the main character of each book.

Recommended Read: The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer | Christian  Douglass Writes
There are new covers which are also awesome but these better illustrate my point. They keep a consistent minimal but dramatic color pallet, one with duller colors for the villain’s book, and an old fashioned elaborate font that looks like it came out of the Renaissance Fair.

This article will focus on the first book, Cinder, and will contain spoilers. At first, I tried to write this article by explaining the tropes out of context, but in the end they were worked into the plot so well that it was impossible. These books are fairly predictable in terms of overall plot by nature of being fairy tale retellings, but there are some interesting twists within the way they connect, so proceed at your own discretion if you’d like to read this series with a fresh view. Content Warnings for plague, fire/burns, mind-control, and fantasy racism. Rereading these books in 2021 is really interesting, because while they don’t predict every aspect of a pandemic, they still hold up in a lot of ways and the story and characters are as interesting as ever. I meant to skim the story to find the certain quotes I wanted to use, but ended up sitting down and reading the whole book in an afternoon!

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Tackling Tropes

Hello Hello! This post is going to be a little different from the usual Personal Process series, since this week it’s a special request from my good friend Katie Koontz. I interviewed her about her character Bolte for an earlier post, and when she asked me to cover character tropes, I wholeheartedly agreed! Today, I’m doing a deep dive into how tropes are used in storytelling, some fun ways to play with them, and offering a few exercises to think about how they impact your story.

Tropes as Tools: Definitions, and how they differ from cliches.

There are a MILLION definitions out there but for the sake of this article, I’m going to use the broadest term: A Trope is a storytelling shortcut or motif that conveys information to the audience. If you notice a pattern, plot device, symbol, or archetype in three separate pieces of media, it could be classified as a trope. In fact, even the Rule of 3 is a ubiquitous trope. Every piece of media has them, and they aren’t objectively good or bad, they just exist. Saying you’re trying to write without tropes is like saying you’re going to write without a font.

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May Goals Recap

School’s out! This was my third semester of Zoom University, and I cannot tell you how happy I am to be done with that nonsense. I survived organic chemistry and thermodynamics, finished my business minor, and missed my GPA goal by only 0.02 points, so I’ll take what I can get. Thankfully, I’ll be back on campus for next semester, and I’m half done with my undergrad degree now, so I am looking forward to a quiet summer of work and catching up on my writing! I also can’t believe how much I was able to get done as soon as I wasn’t spending all my free time studying. This month was a win on all counts, and I’ve got big plans for break!

Overall Goals: Won by 6.5 points – 19/24

Creative Goals: Won by 1 point – 4/6

Publish the end of Four Hours for Bridge Four: This is my Stormlight Archives fanfic, now completed! I rewrote the sea shanty “Four Hours” by the Longest Johns into a bridge-crew work song, and wrote one-shots to go along with each stanza from the different members of Bridge Four. I’m really pleased with how it turned out, and even more pleased that it’s done and I can add another WIP to the Completed Works bin. It’s on AO3 if you want to check it out!

Edit 10k in Storge: This month, I’ve finished chapters 5, 6, and half of 7, which translates to about 30K words and 60 pages total. I’ve also reworked my plan for the middle to resolve a lot of issues with exposition, pacing, and tying subplots into the main arc. Projected length for the book is 120K words in 26 chapters, which means I’m also about a fourth of the way through the edit. Small progress, but good progress nonetheless! If you’d like to read a more in-depth breakdown of my editing process, you can check out this post.

Write 5K in Runaways: Unfortunately with the way finals worked out in the first two weeks of the month, all my writing got pushed to the end and by focusing on Storge, I just ran out of time to finish this goal. Sometimes that happens when you prioritize, but at least I was able to mark off one of them instead of splitting my time and not marking off either.

Draw 20 things: I had intended to do mermay but between finals, work, and writing, I think I only did ten doodles and most of them were human OCs anyhow. I did a few illustrations for friend’s birthdays, and it was fun to work on new characters!

Catch up on Goodreads reading goal: A brief tangent, but is anyone else annoyed that Goodreads counts “Books” as the only metric of reading rather than pages, or time spent? It takes me a month to get through a Stormlight book and three hours to finish a middle grade fantasy – what gives? Podcasts also count as audiobooks now, apparently, so I was able to retroactively add the first 3 seasons of The Magnus Archives. When most of my reading happens through audio in the car, that’s a really nice feature. Not included in the formal count, but totally included in my personal count, is the novel I beta read for my friend Siarven: Dreams Shadow. It’s one of my favorites this year, and I was honored to interview them about it’s worldbuilding! If you’re curious, you can check out that article here.

Queue Website posts and post to Instagram 2x a week: Done! If you want to catch up, there’s an archive pinned to the top of my homepage 🙂


A short post for this week, since by the time you read this I’ll be on vacation, but hopefully it’s an interesting one! This month, I’ll be covering Tropes and Adaptations, which was a topic recommended by my good friend Katie. If you want to recommend a topic of your own, please feel free to leave a comment! Until then, Happy writing! 🙂

Perfect Prose: “The Pedestrian” by Ray Bradbury

Today I’m covering a short story that may already be familiar to my American followers from our high school English classes. Ray Bradbury is the author of many famous dystopian, science fiction and fantasy works such as Fahrenheit 451, and I was introduced to “The Pedestrian” as the primer for our unit on that book. While most English classes focus on analyzing diction and prose, and I could have picked any of the countless pieces I had to dissect over the years, I picked this one because I remember how vivid it was, and how it was the first time I really understood the way words could be used to draw somebody into a story. 10th grade was the year I started seriously learning about the writing craft and working on my own books, and this was the first time I really read like a writer. The act of being able to pick apart a story and learn how it works and then using that knowledge to put your own stories together is a valuable skill that I need to practice more, and it’s what I’m hoping to share with you by doing this series of reading recommendations. So let’s see what we can learn together, shall we?

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Editing Your Novel: My Personal Process

Most writers have a serious love/hate relationship with editing. Rereading your old writing is a special type of painful, but the process of refining the words into something beautiful can be thoroughly satisfying as you watch your skill with writing grow. I’ve been editing the first draft of Storge recently, so I am closely acquainted with that feeling, but I’ve figured out a method at works for me and makes the job a whole lot more enjoyable. It won’t be perfect for everyone, but I thought I’d share it in case you could learn something from it!

For context, when I say I’m editing the “first draft”, I mean I’m editing the first completed draft of the story. It’s the first full manuscript I’ve finished, not the very first set of words I put to page. I started several variations of the story before realizing I had too many plot holes and characterization problems to continue. Then I would quit drafting after few chapters to go back to the drawing board. There were a few reasons for that original block. First, Storge is a very complicated story and I didn’t have enough experience or skill to execute it yet. Second, I was still figuring out my own process and didn’t yet know that I needed a detailed plan in order to tell that kind of story. I think this draft is the 5th version, but it’s the only completed one, which means its the only one that really matters for the sake of this discussion. All of my planning and scrapped drafting ahead of time helped eliminate a lot of plotholes and teach me about my writing process, but it’s not what’s actually being edited today.

I’m also planning to self-publish, and so this guide is geared to that end goal. I do not know where beta readers and professional editors fit into the querying and traditional publishing process, so I’ll hazard a guess that it’s best to go with what the professionals say. Additionally, this process focuses on long novels, but it can also be used for short stories and other works. The steps just would take less time and require fewer cycles of double checking. I wrote this to be as cohesive as possible, but you can always scale it down if needed.

That being said, now what? I’ve got a finished manuscript – how do I even start making sense of this 110K word thing??

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April Goals Recap

Hello and happy April! I don’t know about all of you but I am Thrilled that spring is finally here (at least where I live), even if it means I’m going a bit stir-crazy during my online classes. This was a busy month for me – though to be fair, I don’t know when it isn’t a busy month. I’m happy I was able to get so much done between my classes and job, but I’m looking forward to the summer when I can make faster progress on all my fun projects.

15/24 Overall

7/9 Creative Goals

Do basic website “housekeeping”: As I learn more about building an author’s platform, WordPress, and web design, I realized that this blog was a mess. There was no homepage explaining that it is a writing blog, navigation was convoluted and out-of-date, and the blog feed included the whole post which made it a pain to scroll through. I didn’t understand why my traffic stats were so bad when I was putting so much work into my posts, but once I figured out what I was doing wrong I was able to put some temporary fixes in place until I have time to do a proper overhaul (and teach myself HTML and CSS) over the summer. I’m really proud of how this turned out! If you have a minute to spare, click around the site and see how everything looks. I also made a survey so I can see what content is your favorite and how I can make this blog better. If you could fill it out that would be such an incredible help to me!

New updates include:

  • The menu is organized by topic, and under the “My Writing” page are sub-pages for each of my main WIPs.
  • The pages for each WIP have been updated to include a synopsis, excerpts if possible, featured posts, and a master list of post links for that topic so you can easily find all the information for that story.
  • I figured out how to use the special blocks on WordPress so now my featured/related posts sections look pretty
  • I edited each post to have related post links at the bottom so that you can easily click from post to post without having to navigate back out to the main menu. I also edited them to have “read more” links, so you don’t have to scroll though the whole thing to get to the next post on the main page.
  • The main landing page for the site is still a chronological blog feed, but there’s a sticky post at the top which includes information about what I post, navigation menus, master-links, featured posts, social media handles, and a search bar
  • Misc. editing and updating to individual posts and pages to make everything up-to-date
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